Letter to Judge Garrity from Dorchester Resident

Dublin Core

Title

Letter to Judge Garrity from Dorchester Resident

Subject

Boston (Mass.)
Boston Public Schools
Garrity, W. Arthur (Wendell Arthur), 1920-1999
School integration--Massachusetts--Boston--History
Segregation in education--Law and legislation--United States--History

Description

Letter to Judge Garrity from Dorchester resident, who felt that his city and "country are no longer a Democracy." He also showed concern about a "black Boston, not an integrated one."

Creator

Name Redacted

Source

Wendell Arthur Garrity papers on the Boston Schools Desegregation Case, 1972-1997.

Publisher

University Archives and Special Collections of the University of Massachusetts Boston.

Date

July 28, 1974

Contributor

Maranan, Vini

Rights

This item is made available for research and educational purposes by the University of Massachusetts Boston. Rights status is not evaluated. Copyright information can be found online at the University of Massachusetts Boston.

Relation

Wendell Arthur Garrity papers on the Boston Schools Desegregation Case, 1972-1997. View the finding aid for more related materials.

Format

PDF (Computer file format)

Language

English

Type

Text

Identifier

Garrity 04_Redacted.pdf

Text Item Type Metadata

Text

[Redacted]
Dorchester, Mass 02125
July 28, 1974
Dear Judge Garrity,
I was born in the North End of Boston, many years ago; and I have lived to know that my Boston and my country are no longer a Democracy.
When parents are not allowed to send their children to schools near home, or schools of their choice; it is time to leave Boston as many are doing.
When jobs are given for color, and not ability, as you propose, we are in a sad way.
Why not do the right thing by your favor of people?
Have homes built in Wellesley and other suburbs, and they all can feel equal?
If you could live in Roxbury or parts of Dorchester, and meet children who are afraid to go outside to play, for fear of being beaten; then you might feel different.
If you pass your laws, we will before long have a black Boston, not an integrated one.
I believe in justice for all; but equal opportunities, according to ones abilities.
Trusting you will see that your rules are not what I feel are Just, I am.
Sincerely,
[Redacted]

Files

Citation

Name Redacted, “Letter to Judge Garrity from Dorchester Resident,” Stark & Subtle Divisions: A Collaborative History of Segregation in Boston, accessed October 20, 2020, https://bosdesca.omeka.net/items/show/107.

Geolocation